Contributors

Jon D. Michaels

Professor of Law

UCLA School of Law

Jon Michaels is Professor of Law at the UCLA School of Law, where he teaches and writes about administrative law, national security law, bureaucracy, privatization, and the separation of powers.

Michaels is a graduate of Williams College, Oxford University, where he was a Marshall Scholar, and Yale Law School, where he served as articles editor for the Yale Law Journal. Michaels clerked first for Judge Guido Calabresi of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and then for Justice David Souter of the U.S. Supreme Court. Immediately prior to his appointment at UCLA, Michaels worked as an associate in Arnold & Porter’s National Security Law and Public Policy Group in Washington, D.C.

His current book project, Constitutional Coup: Privatization’s Threat to the American Republic, locates and endorses a deep and enduring constitutional commitment to separating, checking, and balancing State power in whatever form that power happens to take. This book develops and expounds an overarching constitutional theory of American public law that weaves together the Framers’ original tripartite scheme, Franklin Roosevelt’s alphabet agencies, Ronald Reagan’s privatization revolution, and the instant Trumpist movement to run government like a business. Constitutional Coup will be published by Harvard University Press in late 2017.

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Uphold the Oath

9/7/17  //  Quick Reactions

Federal employees are publicly reaffirming their loyalty, patriotism, and commitment to the Constitution.

Jon D. Michaels

UCLA School of Law

Congress’s Personnel Power

8/22/17  //  In-Depth Analysis

Congress should engender a robust administrative separation of powers, ensuring that a forceful bureaucracy (and an engaged public) can advance congressional priorities and check those of the President

Jon D. Michaels

UCLA School of Law

Re-Privatizing The Military Would Be a Big Mistake

7/24/17  //  Commentary

The decision to engage militarily should remain the hardest decision a president has to make.

Jon D. Michaels

UCLA School of Law

First Tragedy, Now Farce

5/15/17  //  In-Depth Analysis

Those who forget history are indeed doomed to repeat it. But when history repeats, it often shifts in the repetition: first acts come as tragedy and then return as farce. By many measures, Nixon was a tragic figure. Trump, by contrast, is pure farce. And unlike tragedies, farces don’t end with a flash of recognition—a moment of self-awareness like King Lear’s on the heath. Farces just keep going until someone cries "enough!"

Jon D. Michaels

UCLA School of Law

Making Bureaucracy Great Again: Trump’s New Office of Innovation

3/27/17  //  Quick Reactions

Jared Kushner says he will run government like a business. But this administration has no understanding of government, or of business. And it doesn't respect the distinctive, unbusinesslike practices and principles of running a government.

Jon D. Michaels

UCLA School of Law

American Cognitive Dissonance

3/17/17  //  Commentary

Perhaps some good may come from Trump’s ham-fisted efforts to drain the swamp: a revitalization of the bureaucracy, which renders important services to the nation.

Jon D. Michaels

UCLA School of Law