Trump has declared open war on Obamacare

10/16/17  //  Commentary

With its abrupt decision to terminate the cost-sharing subsidies, the Trump administration has thrown the exchanges into chaos on the eve of open enrollment; it has imperiled the full faith and credit of the United States; and it will cause a massive increase in federal spending.

Nick Bagley

University of Michigan Law School

The Easy Take And The Right Take On The Charlottesville Lawsuit

10/16/17  //  Commentary

There are two ways to look at one of the recent lawsuits against the organizers of the Charlottesville rally, the easy way and the right way.

Leah Litman

U.C. Irvine School of Law

Ending a Critical Obamacare Subsidy

10/12/17  //  Commentary

The Trump administration will terminate the Affordable Care Act’s cost-sharing payments, further destabilizing the already-fragile exchanges on the eve of open enrollment. The legal fallout will be complex, messy, and expensive.

Nick Bagley

University of Michigan Law School

Versus Trump: The Contraception Mandate Challenges

10/12/17  //  Commentary

On this week’s episode of Versus Trump, Easha and Jason discuss the Administration's drastic expansion of the number of companies that may now offer health insurance that does not cover birth control, as well as several lawsuits that were immediately filed challenging these new regulations. Listen now!

Easha Anand

San Francisco

President Trump’s 'Pro-Life' Week

10/9/17  //  Commentary

There are many ways to protect life, yet we often speak as if restricting abortion is the only way to do so

Rachel Tuchman

Private Practice

The Value of Gerrymandering

10/7/17  //  Commentary

What is the value to democracy from political gerrymandering for partisan advantage? The intuitive answer is the right one: None.

G. Michael Parsons

Private Practice

The Trump Administration and Contraception Coverage

10/6/17  //  Commentary

The Department of Health and Human Services has released two new rules limiting access to contraception coverage. They're both legally flawed.

Nick Bagley

University of Michigan Law School

Versus Trump: So, Can California Really Do That?

10/5/17  //  Commentary

On this week’s episode of Versus Trump, Charlie and Jason discuss a recently-passed bill awaiting the signature of California Governor Jerry Brown that, if signed into law, would require presidential candidates to disclose five years of federal of tax returns in order to appear on the ballot in California. Jason and Charlie ask each other whether California has the constitutional power to do that, and, if so, whether it's a good idea. Listen now!

Charlie Gerstein

Civil Rights Corps

Pardon But Don’t Forget

10/4/17  //  Commentary

DOJ supports Arpaio's request that Judge Susan Bolton vacate his criminal contempt conviction. But she could instead simply dismiss the case and let the contempt ruling linger.

Bernadette Meyler

Stanford Law School

Our Imperiled Absolutist First Amendment

10/3/17  //  Commentary

Recent developments could imperil constitutional protections for expressive freedom.

Zachary Price

U.C. Hastings College of the Law

What Is The Government’s Word Worth In Court? (Part II)

9/29/17  //  Commentary

How much does the Supreme Court consider what the government has said in previous cases?

Leah Litman

U.C. Irvine School of Law

Versus Trump: [This Episode Blocked]

9/28/17  //  Commentary

On this week’s episode of Versus Trump, Easha, Jason, and Charlie dive into the merits of a lawsuit brought by Twitter users who have been blocked by @realDonaldTrump. They claim the President's blocking violates the First Amendment. Listen now!

Easha Anand

San Francisco

Charlie Gerstein

Civil Rights Corps

Faux Federalism

9/28/17  //  Commentary

Graham-Cassidy should be seen for what it is: an effort to prevent any level of government, state or federal, from making good on the promise of universal coverage.

Nick Bagley

University of Michigan Law School

What Is The Government’s Word Worth In Court? (Part I)

9/28/17  //  Commentary

How much does the Supreme Court consider what the government has said in previous cases?

Leah Litman

U.C. Irvine School of Law