Contributors

Leah Litman

Assistant Professor of Law

University of California, Irvine, School of Law

Prof. Leah Litman researches and writes on constitutional law with a particular focus on federalism and federal post-conviction review.  Her recent work has appeared or will appear in the Michigan Law Review, the Virginia Law Review, the Duke Law Journal, the Northwestern Law Review, and the Federal Sentencing Reporter as well as several online journals including the Columbia Law Review Sidebar.

After graduating from the University of Michigan Law School, she clerked for Judge Jeffrey S. Sutton on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit and Justice Anthony M. Kennedy on the U.S. Supreme Court.  Following her clerkships, she worked at Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP, where she specialized in appellate litigation. Prof. Litman was also a Climenko Fellow & Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School and received one of the inaugural HLS Student Government Teaching & Advising Awards.

Prof. Litman maintains an active pro bono practice.  Most recently, she was on an amicus brief in Beckles v. United States. She was also on the merits briefs in Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt and an amicus brief in Welch v. United States. She also assisted arguing counsel in DeBoer v. Snyder and assisted with drafting the opening brief in Obergefell v. Hodges.

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See You In Court 3.0

5/25/17  //  Quick Reactions

A quick recap of the Fourth Circuit's decision in IRAP v. Trump.

Leah Litman

U.C. Irvine School of Law

A Reply to Larry Solum

5/25/17  //  Commentary

A response to Professor Solum’s comments on my posts about the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

Leah Litman

U.C. Irvine School of Law

The CFPB Is (Allegedly) A New Kind of Agency. Who Cares? (Part II)

5/23/17  //  In-Depth Analysis

More reasons why the D.C. Circuit should not rely on the CFPB’s purported novelty to suggest the CFPB is unconstitutional

Leah Litman

U.C. Irvine School of Law

The CFPB Is (Allegedly) A New Kind of Agency. Who Cares? (Part I)

5/22/17  //  In-Depth Analysis

This two-part series explains why the CFPB’s purportedly novel structure is not a sign that the CFPB’s structure is unconstitutional.

Leah Litman

U.C. Irvine School of Law

The Constitutional Challenge To The CFPB

5/19/17  //  Commentary

The major constitutional challenge to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau rests on the claim that the President of the United States does not have enough power over the agency.

Leah Litman

U.C. Irvine School of Law

Yesterday's Other Story: Republican Knowledge of Russian Interference?

5/18/17  //  Commentary

Yesterday, a Washington Post story indicated that Republican House leadership may have known that Russia had hacked the DNC and was delivering the contents of the hack to the Trump campaign.

Leah Litman

U.C. Irvine School of Law