Versus Trump: Dems vs. The IRS?

4/18/19  //  Commentary

This week on Versus Trump, Jason, Charlie, and Easha discuss the brewing dispute over Trump's tax returns. Listen now!

The Mandatory Guidelines Predicament in the Sixth Circuit

4/11/19  //  Commentary

A recently filed amicus brief asks the Sixth Circuit to reconsider en banc whether prisoners challenged under the mandatory Guidelines can ever air the claim that their sentences are unconstitutional in light of Johnson v. United States.

Leah Litman

U.C. Irvine School of Law

President Trump, Acting Appointments, and Why You Should Care

4/8/19  //  Commentary

President Trump has a pattern of ignoring the law to install acting officials of his own choosing

Brianne J. Gorod

Constitutional Accountability Center

Versus Trump: Stop The Drills!

4/4/19  //  Commentary

This week on Versus Trump, Jason and Easha discuss a recent decision reversing President Trump's attempt to de-protect Arctic Ocean waters and permit drilling in the Great White North. Listen now!

Jason Harrow

Equal Citizens

Easha Anand

San Francisco

Versus Trump: Mueller-ing Things Over

3/28/19  //  Commentary

The Mueller Report is kinda, sorta here, so, on this week's episode of Versus Trump, Charlie and Jason analyze the Barr summary and then dive into the legal troubles of famous Trump antagonist Michael Avenatti. Listen now!

Charlie Gerstein

Civil Rights Corps

Jason Harrow

Equal Citizens

Why the New Push to Kill Obamacare Is So Alarming

3/27/19  //  Commentary

The Justice Department has a durable commitment to defending acts of Congress whenever a non-frivolous argument can be made in their defense. The Trump administration is putting that commitment to the torch.

Nick Bagley

University of Michigan Law School

The Two Sides of Donald Trump in The @RealDonaldTrump Litigation

3/25/19  //  Commentary

The government’s brief is at war with itself with respect to the state action and government speech doctrines in the @realdonaldtrump litigation.

Kyle Skinner

Harvard Law School

Leah Litman

U.C. Irvine School of Law

Christian Nationalism and the Bladensburg Cross

3/25/19  //  Commentary

One of the core goals of the Establishment Clause is to stave off developments like Christian nationalism and its hierarchies of citizens. The Bladensburg cross reflects and strengthens this troubling strain in American society.

Versus Trump: 100!

3/21/19  //  Commentary

On this week's 100th episode of Versus Trump, Charlie, Easha, and Jason offer a few quick hits and then have a discussion about the effect of litigation against the President personally and against the Administration. Listen now!

Jason Harrow

Equal Citizens

Easha Anand

San Francisco

Charlie Gerstein

Civil Rights Corps

Republicans['] Own Constitutional Discourse

3/12/19  //  Commentary

Democrats used to dominate constitutional discourse. Now Republicans do.

David Pozen

Columbia Law School

Gender Hypocrisy Watch

3/11/19  //  Commentary

The administration’s recent claims about gender violence and the humanitarian crisis at the border underscore the administration’s hypocrisy on issues related to gender.

Leah Litman

U.C. Irvine School of Law

The Procedure Fetish

3/7/19  //  Commentary

If adding new administrative procedures will so obviously advance a libertarian agenda, might not relaxing existing administrative constraints advance progressive goals?

Nick Bagley

University of Michigan Law School

SCOTUS And The Wall

3/4/19  //  Commentary

One of the Supreme Court’s pending cases is potentially relevant to one of the challenges to the President’s emergency declaration.

Leah Litman

U.C. Irvine School of Law

Insubordination and Impeachment

3/4/19  //  Commentary

The widespread executive branch practice of ignoring Trump's statements—or treating them as merely advisory—has saved him from potentially dire political consequences

Joshua Matz

Publisher

Laurence H. Tribe

Harvard Law School

Might the SCOTUS be Wrong in its Unanimous Ruling that Dead Judges Can't Judge?

3/3/19  //  Commentary

The decision is justifiable as a bright-line rule, but the case was not quite the no-brainer that the justices imagined

Michael C. Dorf

Cornell Law School