The Civil Rights Division Bails Out of Bail-In in Texas

2/8/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

Career attorneys at DOJ rightly refused to sign a deeply flawed brief arguing that Texas should be let off the hook for its repeated intentional efforts to minimize the voting power of its minority population

Justin Levitt

Loyola Law School

Performance Standards and Design Standards in New Election Legislation

11/27/18  //  In-Depth Analysis

Congress might learn a lesson from the structure of the Voting Rights Act, even beyond its substance.

Justin Levitt

Loyola Law School

Kavanaugh, Foreign Agents, and American Elections

9/5/18  //  Commentary

Because of a 2011 case called Bluman v. FEC, written by Judge Brett Kavanaugh, a great deal of electoral interference by Russian agents in 2016 may have been legally authorized

Justin Levitt

Loyola Law School

DOJ and the Voter Rolls

7/5/18  //  Commentary

In voting rights, as elsewhere, there’s plenty of reason to stay woke. But if you’re looking for evidence of the crumbling of the Republic, the recent voter roll settlement in Kentucky isn’t the place to start.

Justin Levitt

Loyola Law School

This Week’s Blockbuster SCOTUS Cases Share a Troublesome Common Issue

4/24/18  //  Commentary

Both the travel ban case and the Texas redistricting litigation raise questions about the staying power of discriminatory intent.

Justin Levitt

Loyola Law School

All Your Voter Data Are Belong To Us

6/30/17  //  In-Depth Analysis

Kris Kobach just asked for help building a national voter file in two weeks. That’s massively irresponsible. And it might well be illegal.

Justin Levitt

Loyola Law School

The Commission to Round Up the Usual Suspects

5/12/17  //  Commentary

The President's Commission On Voter Fraud Is Not Designed To Seek Data. Instead, The Commission Has Preordained Conclusions It Will Recommend.

Justin Levitt

Loyola Law School