Contributors

Joseph Blocher

Professor of Law

Duke Law School

Joseph Blocher’s principal academic interests include federal and state constitutional law, the First and Second Amendments, capital punishment, and property. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Yale Law Journal, Stanford Law ReviewCalifornia Law ReviewUniversity of Pennsylvania Law ReviewThe University of Chicago Law Review, New York University Law ReviewDuke Law Journal and other journals, as well as in the online editions of the Yale Law JournalHarvard Law ReviewVirginia Law ReviewTexas Law ReviewNorthwestern University Law Review, and others.
 
He returned to his hometown of Durham to join the Duke Law faculty in 2009, and received the law school’s Distinguished Teaching Award in 2012. Before coming to Duke, he clerked for Guido Calabresi of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and Rosemary Barkett of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit. He also practiced in the appellate group of O’Melveny & Myers, where he assisted the merits briefing for the District of Columbia in District of Columbia v. Heller.
 
Blocher received his B.A., magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa, from Rice University, and studied law and economic development as a Fulbright Scholar in Ghana and as a Gates Scholar at Cambridge University, where he received an M.Phil in Land Economy. He received his J.D. from Yale Law School, where he served as comments editor of the Yale Law Journal, symposium editor of the Yale Law & Policy Review, notes editor of the Yale Human Rights & Development Law Journal, participated in or directed several clinics, and was co-chair of the Legal Services Organization.

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The D.C. Circuit Breaks New Second Amendment Ground

7/27/17  //  In-Depth Analysis

A recent D.C. Circuit decision created—for the moment, at least—an arguable circuit split on a very important issue.

Joseph Blocher

Duke Law School

Out, Damned Spot: What Cure for Unconstitutional Animus?

5/31/17  //  Uncategorized

If a court finds that the government has acted with an impermissible purpose—one discriminating against Muslims, say—what can the government do to remove the taint?

Joseph Blocher

Duke Law School

Constitutional Hurdles for Concealed Carry Reciprocity

3/16/17  //  In-Depth Analysis

President Trump favors federal legislation requiring states to recognize concealed carry licenses issued by other states. But that policy rests on shaky constitutional foundations.

Joseph Blocher

Duke Law School