Contributors

Marty Lederman

Associate Professor of Law

Georgetown Law

Professor Lederman has been teaching at the Georgetown University Law Center since 2005, except for a stint as Deputy Assistant Attorney General in the Department of Justice's Office of Legal Counsel in the first two years of the Obama Administration.  He also served in OLC from 1994 to 2002.  In 2008, with David Barron, he published a two-part article in the Harvard Law Review examining Congress's authority to regulate the Commander in Chief's conduct of war.  In a 2016 article in the Yale Law Journal Forum, Professor Lederman examined the “least restrictive means” element of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act and how the Court and litigants have been misusing it in recent RFRA litigation involving contraception coverage and antidiscrimination laws.  In a pair of forthcoming articles, Professor Lederman analyzes the purported historical predicates for recognizing a new Article III exception that would permit domestic-law offenses to be tried in military courts:  If George Washington Did It, Does that Make It Constitutional?:  History’s Lessons for Wartime Military Tribunals, 105 Geo. L.J. (forthcoming August 2017), and The Law (?) of the Lincoln Assassination, 118 Colum. L. Rev. (forthcoming March 2018).  Professor Lederman regularly contributes to Just SecurityBalkinization and other blogs.

READ OFFICIAL BIO

Subscribe For Updates

Subscribe
Is the Trinity Lutheran Church Case Moot?

4/18/17  //  Commentary

Under President Trump, questions about the role of religion have come to the fore. The Supreme Court was set to decide a major Free Exercise issue this Term, but it now seems that the case is moot.

Marty Lederman

Georgetown Law

(Apparent) Administration Justifications for Legality of Strikes Against Syria

4/8/17  //  Commentary

A document seeking to justify the use of force in Syria has begun circulating outside the government that is said to have been developed within the Administration. But there are significant flaws in this justification as a matter of domestic and international law.

Marty Lederman

Georgetown Law