Contributors

Nick Bagley

Professor of Law

University of Michigan Law School

Professor Nicholas Bagley teaches and writes in the areas of administrative law, regulatory theory, and health law. Prior to joining the Law School faculty, he was an attorney with the appellate staff in the Civil Division at the U.S. Department of Justice, where he argued a dozen cases before the U.S. Courts of Appeals and acted as lead counsel in many more. Professor Bagley also served as a law clerk to Justice John Paul Stevens of the U.S. Supreme Court and to the Hon. David S. Tatel of the U.S. Court of Appeals, District of Columbia Circuit. Professor Bagley holds a BA in English from Yale University and received his JD, summa cum laude, from New York University School of Law. Before entering law school, he joined Teach For America and taught eighth-grade English at a public school in South Bronx. Professor Bagley's work has appeared in the Harvard Law Review, the Columbia Law Review, the Georgetown Law Journal, the New England Journal of Medicine, and the Journal of Health Politics, Policy, and Law. His article, "Centralized Oversight of the Regulatory State," which he coauthored with Richard Revesz, was selected as the best article in the field in 2006 by the American Bar Association's Section on Administrative Law and Regulatory Practice. In August 2010, Professor Bagley testified before the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Administrative Oversight and the Courts about agency capture. In 2012, he was the recipient of the Law School's L. Hart Wright Award for Excellence in Teaching. He is a frequent contributor toThe Incidental Economist​, a prominent health policy blog.

 

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From Big Waiver to Waiver Unlimited

6/26/17  //  Quick Reactions

Perhaps the biggest concern with BCRA is that state waivers could degrade the financial protections available for employer-sponsored coverage

Nick Bagley

University of Michigan Law School

Moral Convictions And The Contraception Exemptions

6/5/17  //  Commentary

Yet another major flaw in the draft contraception rule, which would not only allow employers to drop contraception coverage for *religious* reasons, but would also (without any lawful basis) allow employers who have *moral* objections to do the same.

Nick Bagley

University of Michigan Law School

The New Contraception Rule Is Procedurally Flawed

6/1/17  //  Commentary

The Trump Department of Health and Human Services has proposed a massive expansion of the program that provides employers and exemption from providing their employees with contraceptive coverage. But they have not sought notice-and-comment on the rule, and that could be a major problem.

Nick Bagley

University of Michigan Law School

Taking the Nuclear Option Off the Table

5/23/17  //  Commentary

Last Thursday, fifteen states and the District of Columbia moved to intervene in House v. Price, the case about the ACA’s cost-sharing reductions. At the same time, they asked the court to hear the case promptly. This is a bigger deal than it may seem, and could offer some comfort to insurers that are in desperate need of it.

Nick Bagley

University of Michigan Law School

The Michigan Morsel

5/4/17  //  Commentary

To corral some last-minute votes, the House leadership has endorsed the Upton amendment to the American Health Care Act. That’s a shame: the amendment works at cross-purposes with other parts of the AHCA, is arbitrarily structured, and is ambiguous on a key point. It’s another example of the perils of doing health policy on the fly.

Nick Bagley

University of Michigan Law School

Uncertainty (Still) Has Consequences – and Trump Knows It

4/13/17  //  Quick Reactions

Yesterday, in an interview with the Wall Street Journal, President Trump admitted that he's toying with the idea of blowing up the Affordable Care Act in order to extract concessions from Democrats.

Nick Bagley

University of Michigan Law School

Rachel Sachs

Washington University Law School