The Plaintiffs in CREW v. Trump Deserve To Have Their Claims Heard

8/14/17  //  In-Depth Analysis

Our amicus brief explains why the Justice Department’s jurisdictional arguments miss the mark

Daniel Hemel

University of Chicago Law School

Leah Litman

U.C. Irvine School of Law

Trump and North Korea: Where's Congress?

8/13/17  //  Commentary

Guest poster Eric Segall argues that Congress must act now to ensure that the President does not unilaterally commit an act of war without Congressional consent.

Take Care

The Functions and Potential (but Fixable) Flaws of the “Protect Mueller” Bills

8/7/17  //  In-Depth Analysis

The bills to protect the special counsel from removal have some rough spots that can and should be worked out.

Marty Lederman

Georgetown Law

A Small Glitch in a Bill to Protect the Special Counsel

8/3/17  //  Quick Reactions

Sometimes it matters where in the sentence you put 'only'

Charlie Gerstein

Civil Rights Corps

Versus Trump: The Collusion Lawsuit

7/27/17  //  Uncategorized

On this week’s episode of Versus Trump, Charlie and Easha discuss a newly-filed lawsuit brought by private plaintiffs who allege that Trump's campaign and Trump advisor Roger Stone conspired with Russians to disclose private information about the plaintiffs. Listen now!

Easha Anand

San Francisco

Charlie Gerstein

Civil Rights Corps

The Self-Pardon Question: What Comes Next?

7/27/17  //  Commentary

By Jeffrey Crouch: Might Congress amend the Constitution to take the self-pardon question off the table permanently?

Take Care

How Donald Trump Will Fire Jeff Sessions

7/26/17  //  Commentary

Donald Trump’s Firing Of Jim Comey Provides A Template For How He Will Fire Jeff Sessions

Leah Litman

U.C. Irvine School of Law

Information Wars: The Final Frontier

7/25/17  //  Commentary

Elements of the Republican Party have proposed eliminating the Budget Analysis Division of the Congressional Budget Office.

Leah Litman

U.C. Irvine School of Law

The One Question Worth Asking

7/25/17  //  Commentary

Here's the most important question to ask about indictments, pardons and self-pardons, and obstruction of justice.

Daniel Hemel

University of Chicago Law School

Another Day, Another Smear By Trump

7/25/17  //  Commentary

Democracy depends on good faith engagement and distinguishing “honest dissent” from “disloyal subversion.”

David Sklansky

Stanford Law School

Trump, Pardons, and Guilt

7/25/17  //  In-Depth Analysis

By Mark Osler: Pardons by Trump would be a significant departure from what the pardon power has meant. Clemency is for the guilty, not the innocent.

Take Care

Undemocratic Pardoning

7/24/17  //  In-Depth Analysis

By Bernadette Meyler: History teaches that Trump should not be considering whether he possesses the power to pardon himself but rather what the consequences of employing that power would be.

Take Care

Russia and 'Enemies' under the Treason Clause

7/24/17  //  In-Depth Analysis

By Carlton Larson: If we use “treason” in a loose, rhetorical sense, it is plausible to claim that Trump, Jr., Kushner, Manafort and others committed treason by knowingly meeting with a Russian operative for the purpose of obtaining dirt on Hillary Clinton. But the argument fails as a legal matter.

Take Care

Can the President Pardon Himself? Well, He Can Try.

7/21/17  //  Commentary

By Brian Kalt: Presidential pardons are an important part of our constitutional system of powers, checks, and balances. A self-pardon would test several others parts of that system. As interesting as that might be, here’s hoping that it never happens.

Take Care

What if Trump Fires Mueller or Starts Mass Pardons? It Would Backfire.

7/21/17  //  Commentary

There are more and more signals that Trump is exploring firing Mueller and pardoning anyone and everyone in his circle. So what would happen next? Those moves would backfire spectacularly.

Jed Shugerman

Fordham Law School