//  6/14/18  //  Quick Reactions

By Ilya Shapiro |  Cross-posted from CATO at Liberty

This morning, the Supreme Court ruled 7-2 that a Minnesota law banning “political” apparel at polling places violates the First Amendment. This was ultimately an easy case, as it should have been all along, and this decision was predictable after oral argument.

Obviously voters shouldn’t be allowed to harass, intimidate, misdirect, or otherwise interfere with other voters – and politicking or electioneering can be disruptive, so there’s nothing wrong with restricting that. But merely wearing a “political” hat or T-shirt doesn’t do any of those things, which are covered by other laws anyway. As Cato argued in our amicus brief, a complete ban on political expression should be met with the most searching judicial inquiry, regardless of the setting.

In this time when the freedom of speech is becoming an increasingly controversial idea, the Supreme Court did well to remind us that the First Amendment protects expression even and especially when Americans go to vote.


A Breathtaking Filing in the Census Case

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That the Department of Justice could so transparently tell a court to hold on while it makes up a lie is shameful

Richard Primus

University of Michigan Law School

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There really is nothing the administration can now do that ought to lead to approval of the citizenship question

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When It Comes To Partisan Gerrymandering, Inaction Is Not Neutrality

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The majority's invocation of neutrality collapses when the partisan gerrymandering decision is set in a broader political and institutional context

Danny Wilf-Townsend

Gupta Wessler PLLC