//  6/11/18  //  Quick Reactions

I’ve written several times on this blog about the impressive student-led advocacy against mandatory arbitration.  After Ian Samuel broke the news that one major law firm was attempting to force its summer associates to sign mandatory confidential arbitration agreements, several firms reversed course. Law students then got their career services offices (and the career services at a bunch of top law schools) to demand information from law firms recruiting on campus about whether the firms required their employees to sign arbitration agreements.

Now that the results are in, the question is whether law schools will put any more muscle behind their students.  The reason why that might be necessary is because almost half of the firms—nearly 200 of them!—elected not to respond to the survey at all.  That decision blunts any effort to enable even the most minimal feedback mechanism to address mandatory arbitration—namely, to allow students to make a decision about whether they will go to a firm that employs mandatory arbitration or not.  There are serious questions about whether disclosure is a sufficient solution; as I’ve noted, Adam Levitin has offered some reasons why disclosure may not be enough.  But no one thinks that secrecy, and allowing firms to force mandatory arbitration agreements on employees who have already accepted offers, is a good arrangement.  Hiding these agreements in the dark is what has allowed them to persist for so long, and some number of these firms are probably just fine with that. 

Then there are the firms that apparently launched a full-throated defense of arbitration, or at least an attempt at it.  One firm noted that arbitration can be efficient.  While true, that’s beside the point—arbitration has some benefits, many of which are benefits to employers.  And while some of arbitration’s benefits may go to employees, why not allow employees to opt into arbitration when it makes sense for them too? 

As I said we got the firms’ response.  Now we will wait to see how the law students and law schools respond.

@LeahLitman


Versus Trump: Going to Church In Times of COVID

12/7/20  //  Commentary

On this week's Versus Trump, Charlie and Jason discuss the recent Supreme Court decisions requiring states to allow in-person religious services even while other gatherings can be banned. The pair gently disagree about how hard or easy these cases are. Listen now!

Charlie Gerstein

Civil Rights Corps

Versus Trump: Blurring Public and Private Conduct

9/17/20  //  In-Depth Analysis

On this week’s Versus Trump, Jason and Charlie discuss two new legal filings by the Trump DOJ that blur the line between the President as government official and the President as private citizen. In the first case, the government argues that the President's twitter feed is not an official public forum, so he can block people with whom he disagrees. In the second, the government argues that the President's denials that he sexually assaulted E. Jean Carroll were made in his official capacity as President. Listen now!

Charlie Gerstein

Civil Rights Corps

How the Right to Vote Became Fundamental  

8/26/20  //  Commentary

The Nineteenth Amendment helped cement the idea that the right to vote is a fundamental right inherent in citizenship