//  8/30/18  //  Commentary

On this week's episode of Versus Trump, Jason and Charlie talk about a case that fits our podcast on two levels: it's a lawsuit against the Trump Administration about grand jury secrecy, and any decision could impact the Mueller investigation, which is the biggest Versus Trump case of them all. As usual, you can listen online below, and subscribe via this page with any podcast player or here in iTunes. 

The two start the discussion by going back over 50 years to the unsolved disappearance of Columbia University Professor Jesus Galindez. No one was ever charged or convicted of any crime, but a grand jury was convened to hear evidence, and researcher and plaintiff Stuard McKeever wants those secret records unsealed. The Trump Administration, in a case to be heard soon by the D.C. Circuit, opposes the unsealing request on the ground that federal courts do not have any power to unseal grand jury records outside of very narrow exceptions. If the court adopts the Trump Administration's view, it will not only go against the understanding of most other courts to have looked at the question, but some commentators think it could also affect whether the press could ever see the grand jury evidence that Mueller is creating in his investigation. Jason and Charlie discuss whether they think the Trump Administration will prevail and whether it really could affect what we find out about the Mueller investigation.

You can find us at @VersusTrumpPod on twitter, or send us an email at versustrumppodcast@gmail.com. You can buy t-shirts and other goods with our super-cool logo here

Notes

  • The Politico article by Josh Gerstein that linked this case to the Mueller investigation is here.
  • The briefing is not online at a public location, so we've uploaded the briefs for those interested:

On Clerkships & Wasted Opportunities

12/23/19  //  Commentary

An HLS Clerkship Blog encapsulates some of the challenges to the profession in light of Trump’s reshaping of the federal judiciary.

Leah Litman

Michigan Law School

Impeachment Trials and the Senator’s Oath of Impartial Justice

12/19/19  //  Commentary

Senators who vote on removal following impeachment trials must take an oath akin to that of a juror. The oath requires them to be impartial and vote regardless of the president's party affiliation. Will Senators do that here?

Ira C. Lupu

George Washington University Law School

Robert W. Tuttle

George Washington University Law School

Versus Trump: Method or Manner?

12/19/19  //  Commentary

On this week’s Versus Trump, Easha and Charlie discuss the Trump Administration’s efforts to resume federal executions after a decade-and-a-half hiatus. Listen now!

Easha Anand

San Francisco

Charlie Gerstein

Civil Rights Corps