//  3/28/19  //  Commentary

The Mueller Report is kinda, sorta here, so, on this week's episode of Versus Trump, Charlie and Jason analyze the Barr summary and then dive into the legal troubles of famous Trump antagonist Michael Avenatti. As usual, you can listen online below, and subscribe via this page with any podcast player or here in iTunes. 

They begin—where else?—with the Attorney General's summary of the Mueller report. That leads them to discuss what the summary and does and does not say, and it leads them to wonder what is taking so long for the full report to be ready for release. Charlie then cannot resist discussing the ongoing troubles of Michael Avenatti, and this leads to a discussion on the puzzle of blackmail.

You can find us at @VersusTrumpPod on twitter, or send us an email at versustrumppodcast@gmail.com. You can buy t-shirts and other goods with our super-cool logo here

Notes

  • The Barr summary of the Mueller report is here.
  • CNN's case page on the Avenatti is here. That contains links to the complaint.

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