//  6/8/18  //  Commentary

After the Court handed down Masterpiece Cakeshop, I wrote a quick post on this blog in which I argued that "several aspects of the Court’s opinion in Masterpiece Cakeshop that, if taken seriously, would dispose of several of the government’s arguments in the entry ban litigation (Trump v. Hawaii).  I recently expanded on the post in a piece for the National Law Journal, which you can read here.  I noted the caveat that:

The court is not always consistent in its reasoning.  And there are ways one could distinguish the entry ban case from Masterpiece Cakeshop, though none of them are especially persuasive.  Yes, the entry ban pertains to immigration, but immigration is not a Constitution-free zone.  Likewise, the entry ban challenge involves the president rather than a state official, but the president is bound by the First Amendment to the Constitution just as state officials are. And while some of the president’s animus-laden statements happened before the entry ban, he never disavowed them, and instead implicitly affirmed them by insisting that the entry ban fulfills promises he had made.

 

@LeahLitman


Versus Trump: Kavanaugh's Coming, Plus Updates

7/12/18  //  Uncategorized

On this week's episode of Versus Trump, Jason, Charlie, and Easha discuss the retirement of Justice Kennedy and how his presumptive replacement may rule in Versus Trump cases. They then do some quick hits to update a handful of important cases. Listen now!

Easha Anand

San Francisco

Charlie Gerstein

Civil Rights Corps

Jason Harrow

Equal Citizens

The Travel Ban and Inter-Branch Conflict

6/26/18  //  Commentary

The real problem is the Trump Administration itself. What feels like damage today is largely the echo of damage that already happened, rather than something new.

Richard Primus

University of Michigan Law School

The Future Of Constitutional Discrimination Law After Hawai’i v. Trump

6/26/18  //  Commentary

The future of discrimination law is secure, in short—and securely shut to minority races, ethnicities, and creeds suffering at the hands of a populist majority.

Aziz Huq

University of Chicago Law School