//  5/3/18  //  Commentary

Together with Scott Levy and Rahul Rajkumar, both formerly of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, I’ve got a new piece out in the New England Journal of Medicine:

In an ambitious effort to slow the growth of health care costs, the Affordable Care Act created the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) and armed it with broad authority to test new approaches to reimbursement for health care and delivery-system reforms. CMMI was meant to be the government’s innovation laboratory for health care: an entity with the independence to break with past practices and the power to experiment with bold new approaches. Over the past year, however, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has quietly hobbled CMMI, imperiling its ability to generate meaningful data on strategies for reducing spending on Medicare and Medicaid.

The controversy involves the abrupt termination (or, in one case, narrowing) of several “mandatory” payment programs. … The backpedaling is unfortunate and unnecessary. Mandatory programs are crucial tools for evaluating new payment models, and they stand on a solid legal foundation.

Read the whole thing here!

@nicholas_bagley


Versus Trump: Trump Loses On Family Planning, Wins In The Ninth, and More

5/16/19  //  Uncategorized

This week on Versus Trump, Jason and Easha go through a few updates to cases involving Title X, which provides money for family planning; the Administration's policy to have many asylum applicants removed to Mexico; and the controversial border wall. Trump lost one, won one—for now, and hasn't yet gotten a decision in the third. Listen now!

Jason Harrow

Equal Citizens

Easha Anand

San Francisco

Versus Trump: Healthcare Update (With Guest Greer Donley)

4/11/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

This week on Versus Trump, Jason and Charlie talk with special guest Greer Donley, a law professor at University of Pittsburgh School of Law, to talk about the latest developments in litigation related to Obamacare, including the stunning DOJ reversal in Texas, and recent decisions prohibiting states from adding work requirements to Medicaid. Listen now!

Jason Harrow

Equal Citizens

Charlie Gerstein

Civil Rights Corps

Why the New Push to Kill Obamacare Is So Alarming

3/27/19  //  Commentary

The Justice Department has a durable commitment to defending acts of Congress whenever a non-frivolous argument can be made in their defense. The Trump administration is putting that commitment to the torch.

Nick Bagley

University of Michigan Law School