//  12/5/18  //  Latest Developments

The United States is becoming a more diverse nation.  The Census Bureau reports significant shifts in the racial and ethnic composition of both urban and rural communities around the country. And, with nearly 1 in 5 members identifying as members of a racial or ethnic minority, the 116th Congress will be the most diverse in our nation’s history. 

Accompanying these changes, however, the country has also experienced a resurgence of open racial animus.  White nationalists have marched in towns around the country, and the use of explicitly racist appeals to voters seems to have risen in recent political cycles. 

Today, both the promise of the inclusive American democratic ideal and the deep threats to its realization are painfully apparent. Both the historical effects of racism and its persistence and intractability make clear that progress will not be achieved without consistent and focused effort. Protect Democracy has asked a diverse set of experts from a variety of disciplines to identify steps that could be taken to advance the prospects of a truly inclusive and multi-racial American democracy.  Over the next two weeks, Take Care will publish their thoughts on the path ahead. 

Those posts will also appear on this page:

Looking Beyond the Future American

Marcia Chatelain | We should no longer imagine what the future American will look like, and instead imagine what a democratic America could be like.

Race, Democracy, and Civic Engagement in U.S. History

Max Krochmal | The current attacks on democratic institutions are but symptoms of a deeper disease: the lack of full civic participation by the nation’s ordinary residents

Overcoming Racism Through National Solidarity

Theodore R. Johnson | The formation of a national solidarity is especially suited to the challenge of mitigating the impacts of racism in the United States

 

* This symposium was supported by the Open Society Foundations.


Forced Classification, Biological Determinism, and Sad Chapters from Our Nation’s History

10/31/18  //  Commentary

In rigidly classifying people based on theories of biological determinism, we ignore history at our own peril

Symmetric Constitutionalism for a Polarized Era

10/30/18  //  Commentary

Judges should strive toward constitutional understandings that protect the interests of people on different sides of the ideological spectrum

Zachary Price

U.C. Hastings College of the Law

Twitter and the Political Community

10/26/18  //  In-Depth Analysis

By communicating mainly through Twitter, Trump has asserted the power to define his own political community—and to exclude people from it.

Kate Shaw

Cardozo Law