//  3/14/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

On this week's episode of Versus Trump, Charlie, Easha, and Jason discuss a new lawsuit by Huawei against various Trump Administration officials, plus they delve into international extradition law and look at the case of the company's detained CFO. As usual, you can listen online below, and subscribe via this page with any podcast player or here in iTunes. 

The trio first discuss the new Huawei case, which claims that a federal law that prohibits federal agencies from using Huawei equipment, or even from giving federal contracts to any entity that buys from Huawei, is an unconstitutional Bill of Attainder. This leads them to explain what a Bill of Attainder is, discuss whether this could be one, and wonder whether Bills of Attainder could apply to corporations in the first place. They then turn to the geopolitically related case of the extradition of Ms. Meng, the company's CFO, and then briefly discuss the Manafort sentencing.

You can find us at @VersusTrumpPod on twitter, or send us an email at versustrumppodcast@gmail.com. You can buy t-shirts and other goods with our super-cool logo here

Notes

  • Lawfare is an excellent resource for all things related to Huawei's dispute with the U.S. (and many more topics). The complaint in the Huawei case is here. An excellent explainer about the Meng extradition is here.

Versus Trump: Is The State Department Discriminating Against Same-Sex Marriages?

2/28/19  //  Uncategorized

On this week's episode of Versus Trump, Charlie, Jason, and Easha discuss a decision from a federal court in Los Angeles ordering the Trump Administration to grant citizenship to both children of a same-sex couple born abroad to one U.S. parent. Listen now!

Easha Anand

San Francisco

Charlie Gerstein

Civil Rights Corps

Jason Harrow

Equal Citizens

Is Trump's Emergency Unconstitutional or 'Merely' Illegal? And Does it Matter?

2/24/19  //  Commentary

And because Trump is a threat to constitutional democracy, the stakes over whether to call his bogus emergency 'merely' unlawful or also unconstitutional are non-trivial.

Michael C. Dorf

Cornell Law School

Congressional Oversight Is Not Presidential Harassment

2/21/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

Congress’s power to investigate—a power with deep roots in our nation’s history and precedent—is incredibly broad, and it allows Congress to look into lots of matters that the President would apparently rather remain unexplored

Brianne J. Gorod

Constitutional Accountability Center