//  1/31/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

On this week's episode of Versus Trump, Jason, Easha, and Charlie discuss recent developments in Juliana v. U.S., a long-running case where young people claim that the federal government's inaction on climate change violates their right to live in a habitable world in the future.  As usual, you can listen online below, and subscribe via this page with any podcast player or here in iTunes. 

They start by stating the unusual claims and then discuss the threshold issue of whether a court could actually give them the relief they seek: a declaration that they government has violated their rights and, possibly, an order requiring some kind of action on climate change. They then get philosophical and discuss whether there is a constitutional right to a future habitable world and whether the government has violated that right by taking minimal action to curb carbon emissions. They end with a few more technical thoughts about the case.

You can find us at @VersusTrumpPod on twitter, or send us an email at versustrumppodcast@gmail.com. You can buy t-shirts and other goods with our super-cool logo here

Notes

  • All of the legal documents in this case can be found at the excellent case page here.

Versus Trump: The Past And Future Of Gerrymandering

7/18/19  //  Commentary

This week on Versus Trump, Jason and Easha are joined by guest host Melissa Murray of NYU Law and the new Strict Scrutiny podcast. They discuss the recent Supreme Court decision on gerrymandering (Rucho v. Common Cause), what's next in the fight, and where you can find Melissa's wonderful new podcast. Listen now!

Jason Harrow

Equal Citizens

Easha Anand

San Francisco

Versus Trump: Sarah Stillman On The Asylee Who Sued The Trump Administration

7/11/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

This week on Versus Trump, Charlie is joined by New Yorker writer Sarah Stillman to discuss the case of Suny Rodriguez, an asylum seeker who sued the Trump Administration over the conditions in detention centers. Listen now!

Charlie Gerstein

Civil Rights Corps

A Breathtaking Filing in the Census Case

7/5/19  //  Quick Reactions

That the Department of Justice could so transparently tell a court to hold on while it makes up a lie is shameful

Richard Primus

University of Michigan Law School