The Affordable Care Act Does Not Have An Inseverability Clause

11/5/20  //  In-Depth Analysis

Contrary to challengers’ claim, Congress nowhere directed the Supreme Court to strike down the entire ACA if the individual mandate is invalidated. Congress knows how to write an inseverability directive, and didn’t do it here. That, combined with Congress’s clear actions leaving the ACA intact and the settled, strong presumption in favor of severability, make this an easy case for a Court that is proud of its textualism.

Abbe R. Gluck

Yale Law School

The Fight for Contraceptive Coverage Rages in the Time of COVID-19

5/6/20  //  Commentary

Even the Supreme Court has been required to take unprecedented steps by closing the building, postponing argument dates, and converting to telephonic hearings. Those impacts should be reflected in all aspects of the Court’s work, including the decisions it renders for the remainder of this term.

Take Care

Are There Five Textualists on the Supreme Court? If So, They’ll Rule for Transgender Workers.

5/6/20  //  Commentary

The Title VII cases before the Court present a fundamental question: are there really five textualists on the Court? We’ll find out soon.

Take Care

With Passage of COVID-19 Relief Package, Vigorous Congressional Oversight Will Be Key

4/7/20  //  Commentary

By Brianne Gorod and Becca Damante: Congress’s $2 trillion relief legislation is the largest aid package in modern American history. That’s a lot of discretion to give to an Administration in which self-dealing and corruption are disturbingly common. There is thus an urgent need for vigorous congressional oversight.

Brianne J. Gorod

Constitutional Accountability Center

The Truman Committee and the Importance of Emergency Oversight

4/6/20  //  Commentary

By Charlie Miller & Brianne Gorod: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has announced a Select Committee on the Coronavirus Crisis. The Truman Commission offers a model for oversight of the COVID-19 response.

Brianne J. Gorod

Constitutional Accountability Center

Why HHS Can't Keep Cutting Corners As It Attempts To Undo Non-Discrimination Protections

3/30/20  //  In-Depth Analysis

HHS has recently tried to essentially repeal an important rule that prevents the Department from discriminating across its many programs. But, as contributor Harper Jean Tobin explains, its rule making is both substantively and procedurally illegal.

Harper Jean Tobin

National Center for Transgender Equality

Versus Trump: Should Vulnerable Detainees Be Released?

3/27/20  //  Commentary

On this week’s Versus Trump, Jason and Charlie discuss a lawsuit in Seattle, Dawson v. Asher, requesting that several vulnerable people in immigration detention be released. They discuss the legal standard for detention, why detention centers are particularly dangerous places, and what courts will be balancing when they consider these requests for release. Listen now!

Charlie Gerstein

Civil Rights Corps

COVID-19, the ACA, and the Role of the Federal Government

3/23/20  //  Commentary

Congress has a crucial role to play in keeping us safe from COVID-19. Notwithstanding baseless continued attacks on the Affordable Care Act, Congress is fully empowered to legislate on these issues.

Congressional Oversight in the Midst of Coronavirus

3/6/20  //  Commentary

Congress has historically exercised its broad oversight authority to investigate public health crises and the executive branch’s responses to them, and it can do the same here.

Brianne J. Gorod

Constitutional Accountability Center

How Does The House Decide To Sue?

1/3/20  //  In-Depth Analysis

Since 2015, lawsuits by the House of Representatives have been authorized not by a vote of the full House but by majority of a standing, 5-member committee. Is this structure constitutional?

Madness into Dissent

12/17/19  //  Commentary

Democratic dissents are the last good thing coming from Trump’s NLRB. Now they’ll disappear.

Charlotte Garden

Seattle University School of Law

The Flaws in HHS’s Proposed Repeal of The ACA Nondiscrimination Rules

12/16/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

The Trump HHS has proposed to repeal important nondiscrimination regulations that apply to healthcare providers and insurance companies. But the Administration's reasoning is deeply flawed.

Harper Jean Tobin

National Center for Transgender Equality

Versus Trump: Two Guns Cases, And More

12/5/19  //  Uncategorized

First, real talk: yes, Versus Trump really did get a shoutout at the impeachment hearings on Wednesday! More on that next week. But on this week’s Versus Trump, Jason and Charlie discuss two guns cases. Listen now!

Charlie Gerstein

Civil Rights Corps

Why Regulate Guns?

11/30/19  //  Commentary

When the Supreme Court considers an important Second Amendment case this week, it ought to consider a robust conception of the state's interest in regulating firearms. Properly understood, the state's interest in adopting gun laws includes much more than mere empirical studies about how effective gun laws are at preventing wrongful gun deaths.

Reva Siegel

Yale Law School

Joseph Blocher

Duke Law School

Versus Trump: States vs. Conscience Rule

11/14/19  //  Uncategorized

On this week’s Versus Trump, Jason, Charlie, and Easha discuss a court's opinion vacating the Trump Administration's so-called "conscience rule." This rule would have broadly permitted many employees in the healthcare sector from in any way participating in procedures with which they have religious or moral disagreements—even in emergencies. Listen now!

Charlie Gerstein

Civil Rights Corps

Easha Anand

San Francisco