//  12/5/19  //  Uncategorized

First, real talk: yes, Versus Trump really did get a shoutout at the impeachment hearings on Wednesday! More on that next week, and there's a link to the exchange in the shownotes. We recorded this episode before that happened, but rest assured that we'll respond to the Committee next week.

Meanwhile, on this week’s Versus Trump, Jason and Charlie discuss two guns cases. First, we discuss a court's definitive rejection of the Trump Administration's bizarre decision to try to permit the online publication of plans for 3d printed guns, and then we discuss the Supreme Court's Monday argument in the first Second Amendment case in a decade. We also have quick hits on a few other matters.

As usual, you can listen online below, and subscribe via this page with any podcast player or here in iTunes. You can find us at @VersusTrumpPod on twitter, or send us an email at versustrumppodcast@gmail.com. You can buy t-shirts and other goods with our super-cool logo here

Notes

  • A YouTube video of our show being mentioned in the impeachment hearings is here.
  • The district court's decision in Washington v. Trump is here.

Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue – Requiem for the Establishment Clause?

7/1/20  //  In-Depth Analysis

Those who still believe that the Constitution precludes state involvement in promoting religious thought and experience now have some work cut out for them

Ira C. Lupu

George Washington University Law School

Robert W. Tuttle

George Washington University Law School

Religious Discrimination And Racial Discrimination

6/30/20  //  Quick Reactions

The Court’s decision in Espinoza is similar to the trajectory of the law of racial discrimination in some respects, it also offers a striking contrast in others

Leah Litman

Michigan Law School

The DACA Decision is Trouble for Discrimination Law

6/24/20  //  Commentary

The Dreamers’ victory has been celebrated as a sign that the Court is above partisanship and willing to serve as a check on executive branch abuses. But the price of that victory was a defeat for the Constitution’s guarantee of equal protection.

Jessica Clarke

Vanderbilt Law School