//  12/20/18  //  Commentary

On this week's episode of Versus Trump, Charlie and Jason discuss Friday's unexpected ruling that the current version of the Affordable Care Act—that is, Obamacare—is unconstitutional and must be entirely struck down. As usual, you can listen online below, and subscribe via this page with any podcast player or here in iTunes. 

Jason and Charlie first discuss the nature of the case and wonder whether anyone actually has standing to bring this claim, though they are less skeptical than some others that there is no standing here. They then briefly discuss the constitutional merits and agree that the mandate is technically unconstitutional under the first Obamacare Supreme Court case. But what happens next? Both Jason and Charlie are skeptical that the whole law must fall, as the court held.

You can find us at @VersusTrumpPod on twitter, or send us an email at versustrumppodcast@gmail.com. You can buy t-shirts and other goods with our super-cool logo here

Notes

  • The ruling in Texas v. U.S. is here.
  • Take Care contributor Nick Bagley's piece on standing in The Atlantic is here.
  • Jason mentioned a Cato post criticizing the decision. That's here.
  • Abbe Gluck's post about what the ACA contains is here.

Versus Trump: Versus DeVos 2.0

9/5/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

This week on Versus Trump, Jason discusses the continuing illegal intransigence of the Department of Education, with Eileen Connor and Toby Merrill of Harvard's Project on Predatory Student Lending. Listen now!

Jason Harrow

Equal Citizens

Versus Trump: Straight to the Supremes (We're Back!)

8/29/19  //  Commentary

This week on Versus Trump, Jason and Charlie are back from a hiatus, and they discuss why the Trump Administration has been going to straight to the Supreme Court with emergency requests so frequently. Listen now!

Charlie Gerstein

Civil Rights Corps

Jason Harrow

Equal Citizens

The Trump Administration’s Assault on Fair Housing

8/19/19  //  Commentary

Today, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) published a proposed rule that would substantially limit enforcement of the 1968 Fair Housing Act. This rule is deeply flawed.

Olatunde Johnson

Columbia Law School

Michelle Aronowitz

Private Practice