The Court’s Border Wall Fiasco

9/3/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

The Supreme Court’s decision to stay the injunction against the President’s construction of the border wall made no sense. It is also part of a troubling trend of restricting remedies against unlawful government action.

Leah Litman

Michigan Law School

Kyle Skinner

Harvard Law School

Communications Infrastructure as Public Utility

8/5/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

The Second Circuit's ruling against President Trump for banning critics on Twitter invites a broader discussion about how legally to structure and regulate our increasingly digital public sphere.

K. Sabeel Rahman

Demos & Brooklyn Law School

Versus Trump: Trump v. Everyone Who Wants His Taxes

8/1/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

This week on Versus Trump, Jason and Charlie are back from a hiatus to discuss the President's lawsuit against New York State and the House Ways and Means Committee, both of whom—he says—may be conspiring to release his New York State tax returns. Listen now!

Charlie Gerstein

Civil Rights Corps

Supreme Court 2018 Term in Review: Waaaaay Too Soon to Say that Kavanaugh-for-Kennedy Was Not a Game Changer

7/31/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

We have only just begun to see the true nature of Roberts Court version 8

Michael C. Dorf

Cornell Law School

Can Congress Investigate Whether the President Has Conflicts of Interest, is Compromised by Russia, or Has Violated the Law?

7/29/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

The President's lawyers are urging courts to hold that Congress’s oversight and regulatory authorities simply don't extend to investigating the wrongdoing, foreign influence over, and possible conflicts of interest of, the President of the United States. That's wrong.

Marty Lederman

Georgetown Law

Requiem for a Lone Star Bail-in

7/25/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

The three-judge district court overseeing the Texas redistricting litigation has held that Texas should not be 'bailed-in' under Section 3(c) of the Voting Rights Act. That's a very worrisome development. Here's why.

Travis Crum

University of Chicago

Versus Trump: Sarah Stillman On The Asylee Who Sued The Trump Administration

7/11/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

This week on Versus Trump, Charlie is joined by New Yorker writer Sarah Stillman to discuss the case of Suny Rodriguez, an asylum seeker who sued the Trump Administration over the conditions in detention centers. Listen now!

Charlie Gerstein

Civil Rights Corps

Gundy, Raich, and Faustian Bargains

6/26/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

In Gundy, the liberal justices' desire to protect the administrative state led them to uphold an exceedingly punitive law. But this was a bad bargain. The conservatives will still reinvigorate the non-delegation doctrine, and a terrible law will still remain on the books.

Gregory Lipper

Clinton & Peed

The Bladensburg Cross Decision – A Twisted Cross and the Remaking of Establishment Clause Standards

6/24/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

The Court has adopted unreflectively the perspective of Christians in a political majority, without regard to the perspective of others

Robert W. Tuttle

George Washington University Law School

Ira C. Lupu

George Washington University Law School

Abortion, Equal Protection, and the ERA—Courts Then and Now

6/11/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

A half century ago women and men challenging abortion restrictions were creative in making claims on the Constitution, taking to the streets, to the legislatures, and to the courts. In their audacity and creativity, we can find our future.

Reva Siegel

Yale Law School

Melissa Murray

NYU Law School

Kate Shaw

Cardozo Law

Toward an Expansive Conception of Reproductive Rights and Justice

6/5/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

The responses to our edited volume promise continuing conflict over questions of reproductive justice in federal and state courts—but also highlight new arenas of action in politics, science, and religion

Reva Siegel

Yale Law School

Kate Shaw

Cardozo Law

Melissa Murray

NYU Law School

Reproductive Justice Symposium

5/24/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

Take Care has hosted a symposium on "Reproductive Rights and Justice Stories"—an important new book edited by Melissa Murray, Katherine Shaw, and Reva B. Siegel

Take Care

Can Public Health Help Abortion Rights?

5/22/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

Reproductive justice advocates have increasingly relied on public health research in legislative and judicial disputes

Rachel Rebouché

Temple University School of Law.

Pregnant Workers and Reproductive Justice

5/21/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

Despite legal efforts to eliminate it, pregnancy discrimination remains rampant. Responses based in liberty, temporary disability, and sex equality arguments have met limited success in courts.

Jessica Clarke

Vanderbilt Law School

Immigration Policy Parallels

5/20/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

Now that the Trump administration has identified an additional 1700 children separated from their families, it’s time to revisit the administration’s legal arguments for why it was not actually separating families; with new, questionably legal actions that arise practically every day, we cannot let the way the administration has handled the fallout of its immigration policies slip by the wayside.

Leah Litman

Michigan Law School

Hilary Robin Rosenthal

Columbia Law School