//  1/7/19  //  Latest Developments

Take Care has been pleased to present a series of posts offering thoughts on how Congress might address key issues in antitrust law.

How to Fix America's Monopoly Problem

Lina Khan | Four key steps to creating an antitrust regime that redresses the current market power crisis and prevents its recurrence

Antitrust Ideas: Bring Back Investigations

Ganesh Sitaraman | In the early 20th century, the FTC investigated whole sectors of the economy to identify abuses of power. It should do so again.

Cooperation for the 99%

Sandeep Vaheesan | The FTC and DOJ have welcomed corporate consolidation and monopolization, but targeted workers and small proprietors who organize

Principles for Antitrust Legislation in the 116th Congress

Marshall Steinbaum | It’s time for Congress to re-take control over antitrust and stop letting right-wing judges and cowed enforcers set the agenda

The U.S. Needs Conglomerate Merger Legislation

Robert H. Lande | To preserve competitive markets, Congress should block mergers between our largest companies.

Antitrust/Pro-Worker

Charlotte Garden | Organized labor plays a vital role in balancing corporate power—but antitrust law has historically inhibited workers’ collective action. That must change.

Welcome Back to the Fight

Waller Spencer | In reforming antitrust law, Congress must focus on the big picture, not the minutiae. Here's how it can do so.

 


A Breathtaking Filing in the Census Case

7/5/19  //  Quick Reactions

That the Department of Justice could so transparently tell a court to hold on while it makes up a lie is shameful

Richard Primus

University of Michigan Law School

The Contraceptive Mandate Takes Another Hit

7/2/19  //  Commentary

The decision mounts an end run around other federal courts and prior precedent in the Fifth Circuit and risks disrupting insurance markets

Elizabeth Sepper

Washington University

Pretext and Remedy in the Census Case and Beyond

7/2/19  //  Commentary

There really is nothing the administration can now do that ought to lead to approval of the citizenship question

Michael C. Dorf

Cornell Law School