//  1/25/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

On this week's episode of Versus Trump, Jason asks Charlie to take us through the mammothly long, massively important opinion from the Southern District of New York invalidating the proposed citizenship question on the 2020 Census.  As usual, you can listen online below, and subscribe via this page with any podcast player or here in iTunes. 

Jason starts by asking Charlie to lay out the background of the case and then take us through the highlights of the 277-page opinion in New York v. Dep't of Commerce. He talks about the factual findings about how damaging the question would be for response rates, and then gets into several reasons the court found the addition of the question was either contrary to law or arbitrary. They then discuss why the court did not accept the plaintiffs' constitutional claims—but why that may be a good thing. They end, as usual, with listener feedback. (Note: we apologize for the poor audio quality on this episode; everyone is on the road this week!)

You can find us at @VersusTrumpPod on twitter, or send us an email at versustrumppodcast@gmail.com. You can buy t-shirts and other goods with our super-cool logo here

Notes

  • The opinion is here.

Chief Justice John Roberts’ Next Move Will Tell Us A Lot

2/13/19  //  Commentary

While Roberts deserves some praise for his vote last week, the story of this Louisiana law is far from over. And what Roberts does next will tell us a lot—about him and the trajectory of the Court he leads.

Brianne J. Gorod

Constitutional Accountability Center

The Significance of Chief Justice Roberts Joining in the Stay of the Louisiana Abortion Law

2/8/19  //  Quick Reactions

So no, the abortion right is not safe. But it's not in quite as much immediate danger as one might have thought. And that's not nothing.

Michael C. Dorf

Cornell Law School

The Civil Rights Division Bails Out of Bail-In in Texas

2/8/19  //  In-Depth Analysis

Career attorneys at DOJ rightly refused to sign a deeply flawed brief arguing that Texas should be let off the hook for its repeated intentional efforts to minimize the voting power of its minority population

Justin Levitt

Loyola Law School