Kyle Skinner  //  2/11/19  //  Daily Update


Paul Manafort continued political work for Ukraine months after his indictment, and may have lied in the hopes of getting a pardon. The Supreme Court blocks a Louisiana abortion law from going into effect. Georgia voters suing for paper ballots win their appeal to the 11th Circuit. SCOTUS vacates a stay of execution for a man who wanted a Muslim chaplain at his side. 2018 was a record-low year for EPA enforcement. The legal challenge to Trump’s executive order requiring a “two-for-one” elimination of regulations continues to discovery. DHS unveils a new “Remain in Mexico” plan.

 

TRUMP INVESTIGATIONS & LITIGATION

Robert Mueller argues that a limited gag order is appropriate in the Roger Stone case (The Hill).

Some members of Congress reportedly discussing removing “so help me God” from pre-testimony oath (USA Today).

Joyce Stone asks what the public will find out about Roger Stone’s connections to Wikileaks (Just Security).

Manafort continued political work for Ukraine months after his indictment, and may have lied in the hopes of getting a pardon (WaPo).

 

IMMIGRATION

Patrick Leahy says deal on border funding “95 to 98 percent done” (NYT).

  • Trump offends El Paso with comments on border danger (NYT).
  • Work at the border becomes increasingly difficult for journalists, lawyers, and activists (The Volokh Conspiracy).
  • Two Congressmen have a poster-based war over immigration (WaPo).
  • The Governor of New Mexico doesn’t want a militarized border (NYT).

Obama tripled migrant processing at border, while Trump has halved it, writes David Bier.

DHS unveils a new “Remain in Mexico” plan (Lawfare).

 

CIVIL RIGHTS

The Supreme Court blocks a Louisiana abortion law from going into effect (SCOTUS Blog).

  • Kavanaugh issues the dissent while Roberts joined the liberal wing to block the law (The Hill, Slate, Bloomberg). 
  • The decision puts Roe on “life support” (Think Progress).
  • Despite the temporary set-back, anti-abortion activists are still closer than ever to achieving their ends (NYT).

  • Leah Litman says the so-called victory is a map to how Roe will be overturned (WaPo).

Michael McGough writes that Roberts is simply not ready to “jolt” the legal system, referencing his confirmation testimony (NYT, LA Times, AP, Reuters). 

States are shifting farther apart on abortion rights, reports Jacob Gershman. 

SCOTUS vacates a stay of execution for a man who wanted Muslim chaplain at his side (Religion Clause).

President Trump says his administration has taken “historic action to protect religious liberty” (Religion Clause).

           

DEMOCRACY

Justice Kagan’s speculations in Whitford on the associational harms of gerrymandering are well-placed, writes Nicholas Stephanopoulos.

NC poll worker pleads guilty to advising noncitizen to register and vote (Election Law Blog).

Georgia voters suing for paper ballots win their appeal to the 11th Circuit (Election Law Blog).

 

REGULATION

Recent legislation aimed at protecting federal employees may have unintended consequences, writes Sam Wice.

2018 was a record-low year for EPA enforcement (The Hill).

The legal challenge to Trump’s executive order requiring a “two-for-one” elimination of regulations continues to discovery (Notice & Comment).

 

CHECKS & BALANCES

Lydia Wheeler discusses Noel Francisco’s repeated requests for SCOTUS to grant review before judgement.

Victor Hill argues for changes in Senate confirmation rules (The Hill).




Daily Update | May 20, 2019

5/20/19  //  Daily Update

The federal government’s ban on spending federal funds on abortions means that Medicaid recipients cannot access abortion, creating a burden on women of color and women living in poverty. A new rule proposed by the Trump administration would prohibit families from obtaining subsidized housing if any family member is undocumented. The Fourth Circuit found that the Trump administration’s decision to rescind DACA was arbitrary and capricious – and therefore unlawful – because it was not adequately explained and the administration did not address the impact of this decision on DACA-recipients’ reliance interests. The White House has released a new tool to solicit information from people who believe that their social media posts have been censored by politically biased social media companies.

Karen Kadish

Columbia Law School

Daily Update | May 16, 2019

5/16/19  //  Daily Update

The Trump Administration’s forthcoming immigration plan will focused on increasing the educational and skills requirements for people who are allowed to migrate to the United States and would scale back family-based immigration. Loose regulation of government websites allows executive agencies to weaken policies the executive branch opposes, such as the Affordable Care Act, which has been censored at least 26 times on HHS websites. The Trump Administration will not sign an international pledge to combat extremist content online, potentially because of First Amendment concerns. A new report from Paul C. Light outlines the ways that the House has investigated presidents since World War II, and gives an analysis of how Congress can conduct a meaningful probe into Presidential actions.

Karen Kadish

Columbia Law School

Daily Update | May 15, 2019

5/15/19  //  Daily Update

The Alabama Senate approved a measure that would outlaw abortion at all stages of pregnancy except in cases where the mother’s life is at serious risk; it awaits signature by Governor Kay Ivey. A new law will impose financial burdens on individuals convicted of felonies that make it harder for them to vote in Florida, despite the passing of Florida’s ballot initiative to restore voting rights to felons. Action from the FCC has continued to increase tensions between the United States and China following a unanimous vote to block China Mobile, and threatening public statements from President Trump. Donald Trump Jr. has agreed that he will appear before the Senate Intelligence Committee behind closed doors, following a fight between Republican lawmakers. Florida Governor Ron DeSantis claimed he was not allowed to say which two Florida counties were hacked by Russians in the 2016 election.

Jacob Miller

Harvard Law School