Constitutional Arithmetic Post-Charlottesville: Sometimes One Plus One Equals Zero

8/20/17  //  Commentary

No, the First and Second Amendments do not add up to a right to publicly protest while carrying assault rifles.

Michael C. Dorf

Cornell Law School

The War on Transgender Soldiers Flies in the Face of the Facts

8/7/17  //  Commentary

By Ian W. Holloway & Jody L. Herman: As the Pentagon decides how to respond to Trump’s mandate, we urge that they consider our rigorous research and the lived experiences of transgender service members and their allies.

Take Care

Slavery and the Right to Travel Armed: A Short History Lesson

7/31/17  //  Commentary

By Saul Cornell: The opinion striking down D.C.'s gun law under the Second Amendment relies heavily on a selective culling of historical evidence—and a shocking ignorance of the most important facts about Anglo-American criminal law and its history.

Take Care

HIV is a Health Condition — Not a Crime

7/31/17  //  Commentary

Despite consensus that criminalizing HIV has little public health effect, is not supported by scientific knowledge of transmission risks, and may violate the Americans with Disabilities, states are still enforcing laws against people living with HIV.

Eve Hill

Brown Goldstein & Levy

The Transgender Ban is Facially Unconstitutional

7/26/17  //  Quick Reactions

Such a blanket prohibition, tweeted out in advance of the Pentagon completing a policy review, is so lacking in credibility that its only motivation seems to be animus towards transgender people.

Jamal Greene

Columbia Law School

SCOTUS Severely Narrows Civil Rights Suits Against Federal Officers

6/20/17  //  Commentary

Yesterday's SCOTUS ruling in Ziglar v. Abbasi makes it all but impossible for civil rights plaintiffs to sue federal officials for money damages.

Michael C. Dorf

Cornell Law School

Jeff Sessions’s Deceitful Arguments for Stiffer Drug Sentences

6/19/17  //  Commentary

The AG's argument for harsher sentencing recommendations in federal drug cases is weak and shows little regard for the truth.

David Sklansky

Stanford Law School

Senators to DOJ: Mandatory Minimums Policy Is Misguided

6/8/17  //  Commentary

A new letter from a bipartisan group of senators shows that Attorney General Sessions’s approach to charging is out of the mainstream, contrary to our justice system’s values, and unsupported by existing crime research.

Chiraag Bains

Harvard Law School

Ten Questions for a New FBI Director

6/6/17  //  Commentary

By Allison Murphy: Given President Trump’s documented and acknowledged efforts to interfere with the independence of the FBI, the Senate should presume that could continue under a new FBI Director. It is therefore incumbent upon Senators to ensure that any Trump nominee for FBI Director commits to certain baseline aspects of independence and impartiality before any new nominee is confirmed. Here are 10 questions that require answers.

Take Care

Trump’s Meaningless Paris Announcement is a Win for His Opponents

6/5/17  //  Commentary

President Donald Trump’s announcement that he will withdraw the U.S. from the Paris Agreement may have dramatic consequences for his administration—but not in the ways he might imagine.

Ann Carlson

UCLA School of Law

7 Ways Trump Plans to Transform the Civil Rights Division

5/30/17  //  In-Depth Analysis

The president’s proposed budget reveals an intent to roll back protections for the most vulnerable members of society.

Chiraag Bains

Harvard Law School

Trump’s Visit to Israel

5/24/17  //  Commentary

President Trump’s visit to Israel comes at a fraught time for his Administration and a pivotal moment for the relationship between the two countries.

The Road to United States v. Trump is Paved with Prosecutorial Discretion

5/21/17  //  In-Depth Analysis

Should former FBI Director Robert Mueller decide to bring criminal charges against President Trump for obstruction of justice, he would be acting well within the law, the norms of the profession, and the reasonable bounds of the discretion with which he has been entrusted.

Andrew Crespo

Harvard Law School

Yes, The President Can Constitutionally Fire Comey

5/9/17  //  Quick Reactions

According to breaking news reports, President Trump has fired FBI director James Comey. It's within his power to do that.

What President Trump Hasn’t Learned from the Rodney King Riots

5/2/17  //  Commentary

100 days in and 25 years after the unrest in Los Angeles, the Trump Administration is failing communities entitled to fair and just policing.

Chiraag Bains

Harvard Law School