Abigail DeHart, Ian Eppler  //  8/7/18  //  Daily Update


At former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort’s trial, Rick Gates testified that he and Manafort knowingly committed crimes. Attorney General Jeff Sessions indicated that he would move forward with efforts to rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, even though a judge ruled this week that it must be restored. The Trump administration restored sanctions on Iran that had previously been rescinded as part of the now-revoked nuclear agreement. Prominent Trump campaign donors are supporting a legal defense fund for Trump aides. Jelena McWilliams, President Trump’s recently confirmed nominee to head the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, will roll back rules adopted after the 2008 financial crisis.

 

TRUMP: INVESTIGATIONS AND LITIGATION

At the former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort’s trial, Rick Gates testified that he and Manafort knowingly committed crimes (NYTimes, Politico, WaPo, WSJ).

  • Manafort’s attorneys face a “mission impossible,” but they may be anticipating a presidential pardon, report Josh Gerstein and Darren Samuelsohn in Politico.

President Trump damaged his legal defense in his most recent tweet about the June 9 meeting at Trump Tower, contends Bob Bauer at Lawfare.

Despite President Trump’s arguments to argue to the contrary, the June 9 Trump Tower meeting may have been illegal, while the creation of the Steele dossier was not, writes Philip Bump in the Washington Post.

 

IMMIGRATION

Attorney General Jeff Sessions indicated that he would move forward with efforts to rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, even though a judge ruled this week that it must be restored (The Hill).

President Trump’s immigration enforcement program is failing because of an immigration court backlog crisis, and even with no new arrests it would take four years to eliminate that backlog, explains Nolan Rappaport at The Hill.

 

JUSTICE & SAFETY

The Trump administration restored sanctions on Iran that had previously been rescinded as part of the now-revoked nuclear agreement (NYTimes, WaPo, WSJ). 

The Trump Administration's decision to impose sanctions on Turkey for the release of an American pastor undercuts a human rights enforcement tool, argues Rob Berschinski at Just Security.

 

CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

Steel producers with ties to the Trump administration have successfully lobbied the administration to deny tariff exceptions to their competitors, reports Jim Tankersley in the New York Times.

Prominent Trump campaign donors are supporting a legal defense fund for Trump aides (Politico, WSJ).

 

REGULATION

The APA is at the center of state efforts to challenge the Trump Administration’s education policy changes, writes Charlotte Mostertz in the Regulatory Review.

Jelena McWilliams, President Trump’s recently confirmed nominee to head the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, will roll back rules adopted after the 2008 financial crisis, reports Ryan Tracy in the Wall Street Journal

The Trump administration’s rollback of auto fuel economy standards will likely be struck down, suggests Dan Farber at Legal Planet.

 


Daily Update | October 18, 2018

10/18/18  //  Daily Update

White House Counsel Donald McGahn resigned his post. The number of migrant families crossing the border reached record levels in the last three months, leading President Trump to call for a reinstatement of the family separation policy. The U.S. received $100 million in Syrian stabilization support from Saudi Arabia on Tuesday, raising questions about the timing of the transfer in light of the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. The Trump administration plans to withdraw from the 144-year-old Universal Postal Union Treaty, which allows Chinese companies to ship small packages to the U.S. at a heavily discounted rate. The White House revealed its Unified Agenda, proposing additional deregulation and predicting a decrease between $120 and $340 billion in regulatory costs by the end of fiscal year 2019. A senior Treasury Department employee was charged with leaking confidential financial reports, some of which related to the Special Counsel’s investigation into Russian interference.

Nicandro Iannacci

Columbia Law School

Mackenzie Walz

University of Michigan Law School

Daily Update | October 17, 2018

10/17/18  //  Daily Update

The Trump administration has falsely and dangerously connected immigration to terrorism in promoting policies. President Trump threatened to cut aid to Honduras unless a group of migrants fleeing violence are stopped and returned to the country. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was sent to Saudi Arabia to speak with King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman amid ongoing concerns over the disappearance of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi. Rejecting an industry challenge, a D.C. Circuit Court judge allowed an Obama-era student loan protection for graduates of for-profit colleges to go into effect. DHS’s intelligence assessment reported that the volume of attempted cyber-attacks on election systems in 2018 has been growing, but some argue this may reflect improved reporting and sharing between governments, rather than an “uptick in activity.” President Trump criticized Jerome Powell, chairman of the Federal Reserve, for raising interest rates too fast, referring to the bank as his “biggest threat.”

Jacob Miller

Harvard Law School

Mackenzie Walz

University of Michigan Law School

Daily Update | October 16, 2018

10/16/18  //  Daily Update

The “Watergate Road Map” will be largely unsealed after a lawsuit, improving public understanding a potential report by Special Counsel Robert Mueller. With the midterms less than a month away, federal agencies have not yet finalized plans for countering foreign interference in the 2018 election. The Department of Homeland Security has noted an increasing number of attempts to hack US election systems in the leadup to the midterms, but all attacks have been unsuccessful. Despite his ongoing rhetorical conflicts with President Trump, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis has reshaped the military. The Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed regulation that would require the agency to use only publicly available data in cost-benefit analysis is a boon for transparency and scientific rigor.